Archive for April, 2009

Freeride Project: Mission III Granatenkogel

April 23, 2009

What started out to be a super short notice decision turned out to be one of the best runs of my season. The 3304 meter high Granatenkogel in Obergurgl, Ötztal, was the goal of our third mission for our documentary movie “The FreeRide Project”. Our crew consisted of Mitch Tölderer, Bibi Pekarek, Martin Mcfly Winkler, Flo Edenberger, Xandi Kreuzeder (photografer), Carsten Darr (camera) and myself.

We knew the conditions were perfect: Mitch had checked the face a couple of days before and on the 21st April we headed up with the last chair lifts in Obergurgl so we could make camp at around 2500 meters in the Gaisberg valley and make an early start tomorrow. The ascent was 743 meters in total, ending in a great hike over the ridge to the summit which we reached in 2,5 hours. The run down was incredible, the snow perfect for skiing top speed. It was the fastest and one of the best lines of my season and I was visibly bouncing with energy from the experience for the following 12 hours.

Freeride Project: Mission II in Sellrain

April 7, 2009

Getting the best lines often involves lift or heli access. But sometimes the most rewarding runs are the ones you reach using your own two feet. Mitch Tölderer, Bibi Pekarek, Flo Edenberger and myself set out on a mission a few days ago with the intention of telling a story about the trials and tribulations of accessing high alpine freeride lines without lift or heli access. Our mission took place in the Sellrain valley, 30 minutes outside of Innsbruck, starting from Haggen. The idea we had involved hiking up to 2550 meters where we wanted to make base camp for 2 nights. From our base camp we could access 2 impressive faces with multiple freeride lines.

After only the first 100 meters I seriously thought I wouldn’t make it. My backpack, filled with a thick down sleeping back, air matress, skiing and safety equipment, food, water, a change of clothes and fuel, weighed over 30 kilos, more than half of my body weight. My glutes where aching already. The 800 vertical meters ahead of me which would otherwise seem like an easy stroll where grueling to say in the least. However, after I repacked my backpack to make it more top heavy I felt much better. A good pack is essential. The 800 vertical meters took us a good 4 hours (normally I would hike this in half the time). In two sections we were forced to take off our skis because of the steepness of terrain and icy conditions. However, eventually we made it!

After a break we busied ourselves with setting up camp. This included shaping an even surface for our tents and setting those up, and building an area to cook food and water. I have slept in the snow before, in a snow cave, however never in a tent. Thankfully I had a very high quality goose down sleeping bag and air matress but even then I was quite cold the first night.

I had an excited and nervous churning in my stomach the next morning. What will the face and conditions be like? Will the effort and toil pay off? “Face 1” as we called it was accessible after a short hike of 45 minutes. We left our skins at camp and boot packed up the steep ridge. I found it hard going after the hike yesterday, thankfully I drank heaps of water the day before.

I wasn’t disappointed. The snow was good due to the altitude and aspect of the face. Lower down the warm weather and strong sun had made the snow to dangerous wet mush. After studying our lines we skied them one after the other and watched our buddies from below. Half the fun is watching your mates have a great time! Harry Putz was in position to film us. Here’s my first line:

After a warm up line I chose quite a more technical line, dropping in through a small chute lined with rocks. Lucky, didn’t hit any! Then a hard turn to the skiers left to get away from the slough. 3 big turns, then some smaller ones…keeping my speed…and launching off a 5 or 6 meter cliff at the bottom of my line:

It was so much fun. After 3 lines I was exhausted and although there were more lines to do, I was only interested in getting back to camp and having something to eat and drink.

The following day we hiked up to “Face 2”, another North facing ridge. I couldn’t make it work today. The lines I chose were too hard for me, although on a normal day I had the ability to ski them. Maybe the hiking and sleeping at high altitude was taking its toll. The face was also sloughing like crazy, but the snow was good.

I still had fun and enjoyed watching Bibi who ripped an amazing steep line with 3 drops. She showed no hesitation and was strong on her feet, awesome! We all put on an action packed show and Harry was stoked with the footage.

Jasna Adrenalin

April 2, 2009

Today I learnt a valuable lesson. “Es gibt nur ein gas, voll gas!“ That’s a saying in German which means so much as: always give your best. Today at the qualifications for the Jasna Adrenalin, which is a Freeride World Tour Qualifier, I wanted to play it safe and “just qualify”, not risking anything. What happened? The other competitors gave it their best, dropping cliffs and skiing fluid lines. I skied technically strong with a fluid line, but only dropping one small feature. I came 9th and only the first 8 girls made the cut, so you can imagine how angry I was at myself! Today I was reminded to finally start believing in my own capabilities and just go for it.

The qualifier results for the ski women are following:

  1. Melanie Martinot 25.4 points
  2. Matilda Rapaport 24.1 points
  3. Petrova Barbora 22.4 points

Something I was really happy about was that my skiing buddy from St. Anton, Stefan Häusl, won the qualifier, followed by Sebastian Hanneman and Tino. Tied in 4th place are my other friends Lucas Swieykowski and Richard Amacker. I’m going up the hill today to watch them and maybe do some more filming with Robin Kaleta.

Qualifications and semi-finals venue

All the girls competing today

Stefan and me after our runs