Posts Tagged ‘Lorraine Huber’

Girls Ski Movie “AS WE ARE” Trailer

September 8, 2010

You might have noticed that women are rarely featured in ski movies. So a year ago, five of my friends and I decided to make our own all-girls ski movie, and we’re proud to present you the trailer of “As We Are”. We traveled, skied, planned and lived together last season, visiting each of our home ski areas. The result is beautiful action footage in some of Europe’s best ski areas, and an inspiring tale of a group of girls having fun in the mountains. Get out there girls and go for it!

Athletes:

Laura Bohleber (CH), Pia Widmesser (GER), Lorraine Huber (AUT), Giulia Monego (ITA), Melissa Presslaber (AUT), Sandra Lahnsteiner (aut)

Producer: Sandra Lahnsteiner
Director: Mathias Bergmann
Camera: Mathias Bergmann, Kenny Cowburn
Editor: Mathias Bergmann sweetshots.at

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Lorraine podiums again at the Engadinsnow!

February 10, 2010

The Engadinsnow is undoubtedly one of the best freeride events in Europe, running for the 8th time this year. For me it was the first time I was to compete on the legendary Piz Corvatsch, a north face which instils respect in even the most seasoned riders. I was feeling nervous while waiting for the cable car to take us to the first pylon, from which we abseiled down to reach the top of the face.

The Piz Corvatsch north face of the Engadinsnow

The women were to start after the men, which gave us ample time to check our line from the start and watch some of the male skiers and snowboarders in action. I decided to go for a fast line with a small but exposed air on a ridge before dropping another small but fast air into a couloir. I exited the couloir at full speed, probably over-excited, and wasn’t able to hold myself together for the next turn, which resulted in a full somersault before I was back on my feet and heading towards my last air, which I stomped. Although I was disappointed about not staying on my feet, I was happy with the rest of the line, which I skied fluently and aggressively. First place went to my Girls Ski Movie filming buddy, Pia Widmesser, for a smooth and controlled line, while France’s Olivia Benoit skied into 2nd place with a very technical line in steep and exposed terrain. New Zealand’s Sam Smoothy stole the show in the male ski field with a fast and aggressive line including some difficult airs, followed by French men Mathieu Imbert and Thibauld Duchosal.

From left to right: 3rd Lorraine Huber, 1st Pia Widmesser, 2nd Olivia Benoit

Engadinsnow Winner Sam Smoothy. Yeah bro!!

Visit the Engadinsnow website for complete results as well as great heli and cable camera footage of each rider’s run.

Freeride World Tour Chamonix: 4th place

February 2, 2010

After an amazing day of fresh powder and fun cliff drops last Friday with my mates in St. Anton, I received a call saying I have a starting place at the Freeride World Tour in Chamonix. This is an amazing chance for me and exactly what I want: to compete alongside some of the best female big mountain skiers in the Freeride World Tour. Luckily, Saturday was inspection day so I had enough time to drive to the French mountaineering and skiing capital.

On Sunday I was the very last person to start which gave me a chance to watch the first male skiers and snowboarders on the day of the event. It had snowed 30 to 50 cm 2 days before, but before the snow fall the south facing aspects were known to have been very icy. The result was that the fresh snow was sliding off the hard old layer. Forerunner Martin Winkler skied from the top of start 2, the starting choice of the majority of the competitors, and triggered a soft slab avalanche coming into a steep flank. Only a sheet of ice was left. Although I knew snow conditions were variable and challenging, and after much debating with fellow competitor Jess McMillan who ranked 3rd in the FWT 2009, I decided to pull through with the original line I chose from starting gate 2. I skied my line fairly fluently considering the conditions. To be honest I was happy to have stayed on my feet and land the 2 cliffs I had planned. New Zealand’s Janina Kuzma and I had a very similar run but finally the judges decided the place Janina 3rd since she skied over more exposure than I did. Fellow Austrian skier Eva Walkner skied a fast line placing her in 2nd position, and the winner of the day in the end was Jess McMillan! Her decision to not shred the gnar, but shred the pow, payed off with an original line over some nice airs from starting gate 1. Overall the level of girls skiing was very strong.

Checking my line ©NISSAN FREERIDE DE CHAMONIX-MONT-BLANC 2010 / T. REPO

©NISSAN FREERIDE DE CHAMONIX-MONT-BLANC 2010 / D. DAHER

The competition in the male field was intense. In the end Candide Thovex, international freestyle legend, persuaded the judges with a super fast and fun line also from starting gate 1. Swedish Kaj Zackrisson is one of the veterans on the tour, and a Chamonix local since 10 years. The strong skier took second with an extremely powerful and consistent run, taking clean and big air. American rising star and newcomer Tim Dutton impressed the judges as he chose an original line down the face; creative, exposed and finding the good snow. My mate Stefan Häusl had the run of his life and came in 6th after some huge aggressive airs. The most consistent run among the snowboarders was Austrian Mitch Toelderer’s line, with an interesting line interpretation in the middle, steep section of the course, and taking two solid airs towards the end. Austria is looking pretty strong for this year’s Freeride World Tour!

Next stop for me are some Freeride World Qualifiers in Flaine, France and Engadin, Switzerland and then the Freeride World Tour in Fieberbrunn which is going to be amazing! Fieberbrunn has finally received some fresh snow and conditions there are good.

“Pentes de l’Hôtel” face at the Brévent ski area

1st place Export Gold Xtreme, Mt. Ruapehu

September 16, 2009

From Temple Basin we drove in convoy with Smoothy and Pete to Blenheim, stayed the night at Pete’s place and took the ferry the next day from Picton to Wellington.

Ferry ride from Picton to Wellington

Ferry ride from Picton to Wellington

The obligatory fish and chip stop on our way to "the Kune"

The boys catching up on some reading on our way to "the Kune"

Our destination: Okahune, the town at the southern gateway to the Tongariro National Park World Heritage Site, at the foot of Mt. Ruapehu. One of the world’s most active volcanoes which last erupted in 2007, Mt. Ruapehu is actually New Zealand’s largest ski area offering two different ski areas: Turoa and Whakapapa (and yep, you pronounce the “wh” as an f). The latter was to be our playground for the next week, which is the perfect description for it. Never before have I seen so many cliff bands and rocks to jump off.

The Turoa ski field side of Mt. Ruapehu

The Turoa ski field side of Mt. Ruapehu

Perfect corn snow conditions in the sunny aspects prevailed,  however the take-offs over rocks had melted so far back that one could only ollie over features with a truck load of speed to take any air. Challenging for spoilt me, used to skiing in Europe. Oh and did I mention that it’s pretty exposed here?

Terrain at the "Policemen's" for the Export Gold Xtreme

Terrain at the "Policemen's" for the Export Gold Xtreme

We had 2 comp days – the weather gods truly blessed our event as so many good weather days here are unheard of – 2 runs each day, a total of 4 runs, with the 2 highest scoring runs going toward the final score. I skied a nice solid 1st line in some exposed terrain, the snow had softened up by the afternoon and it was great! For 1 day now I had been eyeing a straight-line at the bottom of the venue which required you to ollie into it blind. I decided after much lining up and psyching myself up, that I just had to do it.

My line on comp day 1 for the Export Gold Xtreme

My line on comp day 1 for the Export Gold Xtreme

I felt really good during my second run and decided to go for it. After all, I had everything lined up and it has just got to be here, right? Well without hesitating I launched myself – I knew I didn’t even have to go that fast to make it over the rocks into the straight line – and landed with both skis smack bang on the rocks. Aaarrrrggh! The moment I touched down I tried jumping right off the rocks again, did a forward somersault and miraculously just skied out of it, albeit in a lot of pain. I got a good smack on my upper back and neck, ouch!

The boys put on an awesome show, with Geoff Small in the lead but plenty of younger skiers on his heels. Sam Smoothy had a scary crash above exposure on his first line but got it together for a second solid run. Pete Oswald skied a really nice, technical line no-one else attempted, airing over exposure onto a small snow pocket followed by a gnarly straight line requiring a whole heap of commitment. Mt. Ruapehu local Nathan Johns skied mostly in the fall-line, straight-lining basically through the gnarliest terrain and just able to hold his speed together during the second half of his run. Click here for the video of comp day 1 on snowtv.

My goal for comp day 2 was simply survival skiing: on pain killers and after much icing I hiked up to the start for my run. I pretty much decided already that this was going to be my only run for today, so I wanted to make it solid. On inspection even the smallest drop seemed kinda big to me, I was hurting and not really having much fun but I had to get this run done to get a score and those Freeride World Tour points. I choose to ski the venue on the skiers left today, with an obligatory cliff band to drop in the middle. I was so nervous at the top of my run, but my nerves settled as soon as I was given the all clear to start. Now I could just concentrate on my line, which I (almost) skied as I had planned. Nice!

Smoothy managed to come out on top by a mere 0.2 points after an awesome and very balsy line. Geoff Small had the crowd cheering with a 360 over his last cliff, the guy can spin! All in all it was an amazing show and an awesome after party.

Click here for the video of comp day 2 on snowtv.

Women's podium ski

Women's podium ski

Smoothy and I got the cash!

Smoothy and I got some cash!

More Pics from the Lyngen Alps

May 6, 2009

Here are some more stunning photos from my recent trip to the Lyngen Alps.

69 Degrees North with Warren Miller

May 1, 2009

I flew to Tromso in the north of Norway on the 24th April to meet up with the Warren Miller film crew. We are producing a segment for the next Warren Miller film about freeski mountaineering in the Lyngen Alps. The Lyngen Alps are located 500 km north of the Arctic circle at 69 degrees north latitude, the furthest north I’ve ever been. We’re too late in the season to see the Northern Lights because at this time of year it doesn’t really get dark anymore. We’re just 2 weeks out of the midnight sun, when the sun revolves around the North Pole and never goes down. The beauty of this place is hard to describe, but it certainly is the combination of the ocean and the mountains that make it so fascinating.

On the East side of the Lyngen Fjord is the Lyngen Lodge, a truly special place for ski tourers and tourists alike to discover the area. The brand new lodge with breathtaking views of the Lyngen Fjord is run by UIAGM mountain guide Graham Austick and Elisabeth Braathen. I felt instantly at home here. The level of service is outstanding, one of the best lodges I’ve ever stayed at. It is high class yet cozy. Some highlights include the great food and wine, the hot tub overlooking the Fjord and the library packed with mountaineering literature.

The view from the Lyngen Lodge

The view from the Lyngen Lodge

The Lyngen Lodge

The gorgeous Lyngen Lodge

Joining me on this trip are Kastle team mates Chris Davenport and Karine Falck-Pedersen; Tom Day, Josh Haskins and Colin Witherall behind the camera and photographer extraordinaire Peter Mathis. We are on a mission to document the beauty of this place and show what freeski mountaineering is all about.

One of the best things here is accessing the ski tours by our boat “The Spirit of Lyngen” and hiking directly from the shoreline. On Monday, which unexpectedly turned out to be blue a bird day, we took the boat to Uloya Island and hiked up to the summit of Blaatinden. The hike was 144o vertical meters and took us around 5 hours including filming.

The ski tours are accessed by boat or road

The ski tours are accessed by boat or road

Dream team Karine and Lori

Karine and me

Mountains, beach and surf: can this get any better?

Mountains, beach and surf: can this get any better?

The ski tours start directly at the shoreline

Our boat "Spirit of Lyngen" in the background

Chris Davenport enjoying the hike up

Chris Davenport enjoying the hike up

Skiing on Uloya Island from the summit of Blaatinden

Chris and Karine experiencing an incredible run at around 8pm

Freeride Project: Mission III Granatenkogel

April 23, 2009

What started out to be a super short notice decision turned out to be one of the best runs of my season. The 3304 meter high Granatenkogel in Obergurgl, Ötztal, was the goal of our third mission for our documentary movie “The FreeRide Project”. Our crew consisted of Mitch Tölderer, Bibi Pekarek, Martin Mcfly Winkler, Flo Edenberger, Xandi Kreuzeder (photografer), Carsten Darr (camera) and myself.

We knew the conditions were perfect: Mitch had checked the face a couple of days before and on the 21st April we headed up with the last chair lifts in Obergurgl so we could make camp at around 2500 meters in the Gaisberg valley and make an early start tomorrow. The ascent was 743 meters in total, ending in a great hike over the ridge to the summit which we reached in 2,5 hours. The run down was incredible, the snow perfect for skiing top speed. It was the fastest and one of the best lines of my season and I was visibly bouncing with energy from the experience for the following 12 hours.

Freeride Project: Mission II in Sellrain

April 7, 2009

Getting the best lines often involves lift or heli access. But sometimes the most rewarding runs are the ones you reach using your own two feet. Mitch Tölderer, Bibi Pekarek, Flo Edenberger and myself set out on a mission a few days ago with the intention of telling a story about the trials and tribulations of accessing high alpine freeride lines without lift or heli access. Our mission took place in the Sellrain valley, 30 minutes outside of Innsbruck, starting from Haggen. The idea we had involved hiking up to 2550 meters where we wanted to make base camp for 2 nights. From our base camp we could access 2 impressive faces with multiple freeride lines.

After only the first 100 meters I seriously thought I wouldn’t make it. My backpack, filled with a thick down sleeping back, air matress, skiing and safety equipment, food, water, a change of clothes and fuel, weighed over 30 kilos, more than half of my body weight. My glutes where aching already. The 800 vertical meters ahead of me which would otherwise seem like an easy stroll where grueling to say in the least. However, after I repacked my backpack to make it more top heavy I felt much better. A good pack is essential. The 800 vertical meters took us a good 4 hours (normally I would hike this in half the time). In two sections we were forced to take off our skis because of the steepness of terrain and icy conditions. However, eventually we made it!

After a break we busied ourselves with setting up camp. This included shaping an even surface for our tents and setting those up, and building an area to cook food and water. I have slept in the snow before, in a snow cave, however never in a tent. Thankfully I had a very high quality goose down sleeping bag and air matress but even then I was quite cold the first night.

I had an excited and nervous churning in my stomach the next morning. What will the face and conditions be like? Will the effort and toil pay off? “Face 1” as we called it was accessible after a short hike of 45 minutes. We left our skins at camp and boot packed up the steep ridge. I found it hard going after the hike yesterday, thankfully I drank heaps of water the day before.

I wasn’t disappointed. The snow was good due to the altitude and aspect of the face. Lower down the warm weather and strong sun had made the snow to dangerous wet mush. After studying our lines we skied them one after the other and watched our buddies from below. Half the fun is watching your mates have a great time! Harry Putz was in position to film us. Here’s my first line:

After a warm up line I chose quite a more technical line, dropping in through a small chute lined with rocks. Lucky, didn’t hit any! Then a hard turn to the skiers left to get away from the slough. 3 big turns, then some smaller ones…keeping my speed…and launching off a 5 or 6 meter cliff at the bottom of my line:

It was so much fun. After 3 lines I was exhausted and although there were more lines to do, I was only interested in getting back to camp and having something to eat and drink.

The following day we hiked up to “Face 2”, another North facing ridge. I couldn’t make it work today. The lines I chose were too hard for me, although on a normal day I had the ability to ski them. Maybe the hiking and sleeping at high altitude was taking its toll. The face was also sloughing like crazy, but the snow was good.

I still had fun and enjoyed watching Bibi who ripped an amazing steep line with 3 drops. She showed no hesitation and was strong on her feet, awesome! We all put on an action packed show and Harry was stoked with the footage.